Dean’s Statement about Sexual Harassment

From the Office of Dean Heller

Dear Colleagues,

I am writing to address several reports of sexual harassment by faculty and students who attended the Council on Social Work Education Annual Program Meeting (CSWE APM) 2022 last week. I want to thank those who came forward to share their experiences on social media, with CSWE, and with my office.

CSWE has stated that they are investigating and I will closely follow the outcome of their pledge to take action. Unfortunately, these kinds of behaviors have been more frequently occurring at professional conferences. Behaviors like this cannot be tolerated and must be dealt with swiftly. We firmly stand with the individuals who have had this distressing experience.

First and foremost, I would like to say that as the Dean of the School of Social Work, I unequivocally condemn any forms of sexual harassment toward students, faculty or staff. The fact that this offensive behavior took place off campus makes it no less serious or worth addressing. The safety and dignity of our students and faculty are paramount, and that safety should be ensured on our campus as well as at events where members of our community are engaged in work on behalf of the School.

I am especially troubled by the fact that students and junior faculty would have to endure unwelcome conduct at a point in their careers where they may not feel empowered to speak up or resist. Please know that the School of Social Work fully supports the reporting, anonymous or otherwise, of sexual harassment or violence by our students and faculty. Employees can contact the Employee Assistance Program for counseling or support.

As social workers, we stand firmly in defense of the dignity of all people. As a School, we also recognize that opposing sexual misconduct is part of our strong commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion for all members of our community.

In solidarity,

Nina Rovinelli Heller, Ph.D.
Dean and Professor
Zachs Chair in Social Work

 

 

 

Adolescent Addiction

Jennifer Berton, PhD, LICSW, CADC-II

Monday, Nov, 14, 2022Register Now for CE programs now
9:30 am – 4 pm
5 CECs

$110 – UConn SSW Alumni and Current Field Instructors
$125 – All Others

Location: UConn School of Social Work Building, Room 104
Directions and Parking details will be included in your email confirmation

Historically mislabeled as a difficult population, this workshop explores the characteristics of adolescent addiction, the recovery pitfalls, and effective treatment interventions that will engage your young clients.

Adolescent Addiction is a distinct problem, with biopsychosocial elements unique to this age group, which indicates there are unique treatment implications. This training explores the unique elements of adolescent addiction and discusses the best ways to both prevent and treat it. While the majority of the training addresses substance use, other addictions – gambling, sex, internet, fitness – will be included.

Adolescent Addiction is often guided by cultural, political, and social forces. Adolescents my be judged for wanting attention, submitting to peer pressure, or making “stupid” choices, depending on the culture in which the teen is a member. The degree that the addiction is accepted is often based on these influences. This training includes a discussion of these influences, not only in understanding how teen addiction develops, but also how recovery can be sabotaged or supported by these influences.

Participants will:
• learn the differences between the adult and adolescent brain
• explore the principles of addiction and how it affects the adolescent brain
• review updated assessment tools for this subpopulation
• Learn strategies to create improved treatment plans that address the adolescent’s unique needs

Social Work Faculty Presentations at CSWE Annual Program Meeting

CSWE APM 2022

We are proud to announce the presentations that UConn School of Social Work faculty will lead at the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) 2022 Annual Program Meeting (APM), from November 10 through 13.  The following list of presentations and sessions represents the wide range of scholarship that School of Social Work researchers are engaged in, including human rights, child welfare, COVID-19, political social work, refugee and immigrant rights, and more.

Thursday, November 10

Time: 3:00 – 3:30 PM
Presentation: “Academic Mothers: A Discussion on More Equitable Structural Policies in the Academy”
Session: The Social Work Gaze and Academy
Author(s): Cristina Mogro-Wilson, Ph.D. and Nalini Negi, Ph.D.

Friday, November 11

Time: 7:45 – 8:15 AM
Presentation: “A Human Rights-Based Policy Analysis of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families”
Session: SNAP and Temporary Assistance Reviews
Author(s): Madri Hall-Faul, MSW

Time: 8:15 – 8:45 AM
Presentation: “Fulfilling the Right to Adequate Food: Examining SNAP through a Qualitative Lens”
Session: SNAP and Temporary Assistance Reviews
Author(s): Emily Loveland, MSW

Time: 10:30 – 11:30 AM
Presentation: “Writing and Reviewing for Refereed Journals: Strategies for Successful Publishing and Ethical Peer Review”
Session: Writing and Reviewing for Refereed Journals: Strategies for Successful Publishing and Ethical Peer Review
Author(s): Cristina Mogro-Wilson, Ph.D., Danielle Parrish, Ph.D., Elissa Madden, Ph.D., and Jeremiah Jaggers, Ph.D.

Time: 11:15 – 11:45 AM
Presentation: “Building Pedagogical Identities Across Cohorts: A Collaborative Autoethnography of a Doctoral Peer Support Group”
Session: American Higher Education and Pedagogical Identities
Author(s): Lukas Champagne, MSW, Elizabeth Jurczak, MSW, and Breana Bietsch, MSW

Time: 11:15 – 11:45 AM
Presentation: “The Importance of Critical Relational Teaching in Social Work Education During the COVID-19 Era”
Session: Teaching and COVID-19
Author(s): Gio Iacono, Ph.D. and Emily Loveland, MSW

Time: 1:15 - 1:45 PM
Presentation: “Increasing Early Childhood Disability Content in Social Work Education: Traumatic Brain Injury and how to Create Interdisciplinary Teams and Family Partnerships”
Session: TBD
Presented by: Emily Longo, LMFT

Time: 2:30 – 3:30 PM
Presentation: “Resurgence of Radical Extremism: Critical Conversations on Human and Global Rights by Social Workers”
Session: Connect
Author(s): Rebecca Thomas, Ph.D., Golam Mathbor, MSS, MSW, Ph.D., RSW, Connie Gunderson, Ph.D., LISW, Sister Angela Kim, IHM, Ph.D., and Johny Augustine, MSW, M.Phil, Ph.D.

Saturday, November 12

Time: 12:00 – 12:30 PM
Presentation: “At the Table or on the Menu: Political Social Work Since 2016”
Session: TBD
Author(s): Shannon Lane, LMSW, Ph.D., Tanya Rhodes Smith, MSW, Kathryn Krase, JD, MSW, Ph.D., and Katherine Hill, MSW, Ph.D., MPP, LISE

Time: 3:45 – 4:15 PM
Presentation: “Providing Students and Professionals with a Conceptual Foundation and Empirical Justification for Cross-Systems Collaboration”
Session: Cross-Systems Collaboration and Global Conflict Resolution
Author(s): Jon Phillips, Ph.D., Daniel Gibbs, JD, MSW, Elizabeth Jurczak, MSW, and Kalah Villagrana, Ph.D.

Sunday, November 13

Time: 9:30 – 10:30 AM
Panel Presentation: “Deservingness, Differential Treatment, and Dehumanization of Refugees, Asylees, and Asylum-Seekers”
Session: Deservingness, Differential Treatment, and Dehumanization of Refugees, Asylees, and Asylum-Seekers
Author(s): Kathryn Libal, Ph.D., S. Megan Berthold, Ph.D., David Androff, Ph.D., Scott Harding, Ph.D., and Cherra Mathis, MSW

Time: 10:45 – 11:45 AM
Panel Presentation: “Fulfilling U.S. Children’s Human Rights through the UN Children’s Rights Convention”
Session: Fulfilling U.S. Children’s Human Rights through the UN Children’s Rights Convention
Author(s): Kathryn Libal, Ph.D., S. Megan Berthold, Ph.D., and Madri Hall-Faul, MSW

 

Celebrating Indigenous People’s Day

From the Office of Dean Heller

Dear Colleagues,

The second Monday in October is Indigenous People’s Day. Also known as Columbus Day, this federal holiday was first established in 1937. Last year, President Biden issued a proclamation to formally recognize Indigenous People’s Day.

Today, many universities and municipalities take this opportunity to celebrate the history and cultures of indigenous people. The very name of the state of Connecticut derives from the Mohegan word Quinnitukqut, meaning “long, tidal river.” Connecticut is home to numerous Indigenous communities, including but not limited to the Mahican tribes, the Minisink, the Mohegan tribes, the Pequot, Nipmuc, the Qquiripi tribes (including the Mattabesic, Paugusett, and Schaghticoke), the Paucatuck Eastern Pequot, and the Eastern Pequot. As a land grant university, UConn recognizes we share this land with those who came before us and continue to contribute to our state.

Highlighting this holiday aligns with the ethics of the social work profession which values the dignity of each person. It also exemplifies our commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion and anti-racism, a cornerstone of our School’s mission.

Please consider taking part in events related to Indigenous People's Day, which are posted by the UConn Native American Culture Programs. Also learn about Native American and Indigenous studies and programming at UConn.

 

In solidarity,

 

Nina Rovinelli Heller
Dean and Zach’s Chair

 

 

 

 

 

Strategies for Preventing and Managing Challenging Behavior in School-Aged Children

Solandy Forte, PhD, LCSW, BCBA-DRegister Now for CE programs now

Tuesday, Nov 29, 2022
6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

2 CECs

$40 – UConn SSW Alumni and Current Field Instructors
$50 – All Others

Webinar link will be emailed when your registration is complete.

In this webinar the presenter will review the most effective antecedent and management strategies that are support by evidence to deal with challenging behavior. Discussions will be had regarding barriers that may prevent treatment teams from carrying out what “on paper” looks like a good plan. Establishing training objectives, timelines, and methods will be reviewed to promote treatment fidelity. If external resources are needed how treatment teams advocate for support will make a difference in the execution of a comprehensive plan for complex cases.

Participants will learn to:

  • identify evidence-based interventions
  • learn how to establish data tracking systems
  • set up treatment fidelity checks

Conducting a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA): The Clinical Interview

Solandy Forte, PhD, LCSW, BCBA-D

Register Now for CE programs now

Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022
6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

2 CECs

$40 – UConn SSW Alumni and Current Field Instructors
$50 – All Others

Webinar link will be emailed when your registration is complete.

Gathering the most relevant information from your clinical interview is critical. Information gathered will help to determine your steps when conducting a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA). We will discuss the importance of setting events and how they contribute to understanding behavior function. There are structured and semi-structured tools that can be used to guide clinicians through the interview process. The pros and cons of each will be reviewed.

Participants will learn to:

  • define and identify setting events
  • use a semi-structured assessment tool
  • define the purpose of a clinical interview

Structuring your Direct Observations and Maximizing your Data Collection Methods when Conducting an FBA

Solandy Forte, PhD, LCSW, BCBA-D

Tues, Nov 8, 2022Register Now for CE programs now
6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

2 CECs

$40 – UConn SSW Alumni and Current Field Instructors
$50 – All Others

Webinar link will be emailed when your registration is complete.

The clinical interview will help to structure when and how you will conduct your direct observations. Identifying the most useful data collection method(s) for your particular assessment case can be a bit overwhelming particularly if time is not on your side. Choosing the appropriate data collection method is critical in order to capture data in real-time that is representative of what is occurring most of the time when you most likely are not present. It is important not to rely on just one data collection method or capturing one dimension of behavior. The observer must rely on multiple data sources.

Participants will learn to:

  • use the information they have gathered from clinical interviews to identify the most appropriate settings/times to observe
  • identify what dimensions or type of data must be collected
  • collect Antecedent-Behavior-Consequence data

Interpreting Data Collected from an FBA and Formulating Recommendations for Treatment

Solandy Forte, PhD, LCSW, BCBA-DRegister Now for CE programs now

Tuesday, Nov 15, 2022
6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

2 CECs

$40 – UConn SSW Alumni and Current Field Instructors
$50 – All Others

Webinar link will be emailed when your registration is complete.

Data. Data. And more data. It all must be analyzed and analyzed well. The clinician must take every single piece of data collected and interpret it in order to confidently identify the function(s) of behavior. The information gathered through the collection data may or may not support your original hypothesis but will definitely inform treatment. You have gathered the information you need to make treatment recommendations, now learn how to put it all together.

Participants will learn to:

  • interpret data collected
  • identify functions of behavior
  • formulate function-based recommendations

Power, Passion and Purpose: Understanding Burnout

Jennifer Berton, PhD, LICSW, CADC-II

Thursday, November 10, 2022Register Now
10 am – 12 pm

2 CECs

$40 – UConn SSW Alumni and Current Field Instructors
$50 – All Others

Link to webinar will be included in your email confirmation

Trainings on clinician burnout typically focus on balance and self-care, which may increase healthy habits, but often won’t alleviate burnout. This webinar goes to the heart of the three most common causes of burnout, a lack of power, passion, and purpose, and how to build each one.

Learning objectives:

  • explore and evaluate traditional clinical burnout prevention techniques
  • examine the concept of power, what it is and how to build it in oneself and in the workplace
  • investigate passion by remembering early passion for work and how to reignite it
  • consider one’s purpose and how to increase its value to promote job satisfaction

Supervising the Diagnosing Clinician

Jennifer Berton, PhD, LICSW, CADC-IIRegister Now

Thurs, Dec 15, 2022
10 am – 12 pm
2 CEC

$40 – UConn SSW Alumni and Current Field Instructors
$50 – All Others

Webinar link will be emailed when your registration is complete.

This training marries the essential elements of a successful supervisory practice with the foundation of the diagnostic process. Participants will gain tools to ensure that each supervised clinician can learn how to diagnose disorders and conditions that will be a treatment focus. This training will give participants tools to both evaluate and improve diagnosing tools, and how to troubleshoot and intervene as may be needed.