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Celebrating Martin Luther King Jr. Day

From the Office of Dean Heller

Dear Colleagues,

On Monday, January 16, we recognize Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. For four decades, this holiday has provided an opportunity to celebrate the life and contributions of this legendary civil rights leader. At UConn School of Social Work, we also take this moment to reaffirm our commitment to Dr. King’s Dream and the ongoing struggle for racial justice.

The goal of achieving racial, social, and economic justice is central to our School’s mission and a major focus of Social Work for Impact: Our Five-Year Strategic Plan. Our faculty and staff are deeply committed to continuing to engage in meaningful dialogue about diversity, equity, inclusion, and anti-racism in our community and in our work. We also pledge to hold ourselves accountable and to take action to advance racial justice.

As part of this commitment, we recently published our School’s definition of anti-racism in order to clarify our purpose and goals moving forward. It states that anti-racism is “collective and individual actions designed to ensure that all members of our community experience, in equal measure over time and place, belonging, power, esteem, success, and wellness.” As a community of social work students, faculty and staff, we know that our mission can only be realized when justice is achieved for those who have long been excluded, especially racially oppressed people in our community and world.

On MLK Day, I encourage you to participate in events organized at UConn and in our community. These include the MLK Living Legacy Convocation and the MLK Day of Service.  For information about these events and other events across the state, please visit UConn’s Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Justice website.

 

In solidarity,

Nina Rovinelli Heller, Ph.D.
Dean and Professor
Zachs Chair in Social Work

 

 

Fundamentals of Emotional Freedom Technique

Catherine Ewing, LCSW, MDivRegister Now for CE programs now

Monday, Feb 27
10 am – 12 pm (ET)
2 CECs

$40 – UConn SSW Alumni and Current Field Instructors
$50 – All Others

Webinar link will be emailed when your registration is complete

Emotional Freedom Technique is a form of Energy Psychology, combining psychotherapy and energy healing techniques. It is based on the understanding of the human body as an electrical system and the recognition of the systems of subtle energy that surround and interface with the physical body. When that energy system is disrupted, a person experiences mental, emotional or physical imbalance.

EFT has application across a broad range of issues, including stress and anxiety related disorders, PTSD, physical pain, self-sabotage, cravings and addictions and performance. It draws from a variety of proven modalities, including Thought Field Therapy, acupuncture, biofeedback, EMDR, hypnosis, cognitive behavioral therapy and applied kinesiology.
Various forms of Energy Psychology have been practiced since the early 1980s. In recent years, EFT has been researched in more than 10 countries, by more than 60 investigators, whose results have been published in more than 20 different peer-reviewed journals.

In this engaging workshop, participants will learn how to use Emotional Freedom Technique both for their own self-care and for working with their clients, students, colleagues and families.

In this engaging seminar, participants will:

  • learn about the psychological and medical roots of EFT
  • learn the Basic Recipe and Tapping Sequence of EFT
  • understand how EFT can be used to bring down high emotional charge in both current issues such as anxiety and fear, as well as from past trauma
  • have a direct experience of the benefits of tapping
  • learn how to use Emotional Freedom Technique with their clients and for their own self-care

 

SSW Faculty and Students Present at SSWR Conference 2023

Several UConn School of Social Work faculty and students are presenting their research at the 27th annual Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR) conference in Phoenix, Arizona, from January 11 to 15. The theme of the conference is "Social Work Science and Complex Problems: Battling Inequities and Building Solutions." The research presented by SSW covers a wide range of areas and our expertise, including child welfare, foster care, sexual and gender minority youth mental health, and substance use, among others.

 

Thursday, January 12

Time: 3:15 – 4:45 PM
Presentation: Factors Associated with Child Welfare Diversion for Substance-Exposed Infants
Location: Hospitality 2 – Room 444
Author(s): Margaret Lloyd Sieger, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Cynthia Nichols, LCSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Melissa Sienna, UConn Health; Marilyn Sanders, MD, UConn School of Medicine

 

Friday, January 13

Time: 7:00 – 8:30 AM
Presentation: Acamamas: Academic Mothers
Location: Paradise Valley
Author(s): Cristina Mogro-Wilson, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Nalini Negi, PhD, University of Maryland Baltimore; Danielle Parrish, PhD, Baylor University

Time: 8:00 – 9:30 AM
Presentation: Changes in Social Support over Time and Attention to Congregate Care Placement Among Older Youth Transitioning from Foster Care: Ages 17-24
Location: Hospitality 3 – Room 432
Author(s): Keunhye Park, PhD, Michigan State University; Nathanael Okpych, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Mark Courtney, PhD, University of Chicago

Time: 8:00 – 9:30 AM
Presentation: Emerging into Parenthood While in Foster Care: Correlates of Active Parenting Behaviors at Ages 21 and 23
Location: Hospitality 3 – Room 432
Author(s): Justin Harty, PhD, Arizona State University; Sunggeun (Ethan) Park, PhD, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; Nathanael Okpych, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Mark Courtney, PhD, University of Chicago

Time: 8:00 – 9:30 AM
Presentation: Examining Prevalence and Predictors of Food Insecurity for Transition-Age Foster Youth
Location: Hospitality 3 – Room 432
Author(s): Melanie Nadon, University of Chicago; Sunggeun (Ethan) Park, PhD, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; Nathanael Okpych, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Justin Harty, PhD, Arizona State University; Mark Courtney, PhD, University of Chicago

Time: 8:00 – 9:30 AM
Presentation: The Role of Enduring Relationships in Early-Adult Outcomes Among Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care
Location: Hospitality 3 – Room 432
Author(s): Nathanael Okpych, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Sunggeun (Ethan) Park, PhD, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; Jenna Powers, MSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Justin Harty, PhD, Arizona State University; Mark Courtney, PhD, University of Chicago

Time: 8:00 – 9:30 AM
Presentation: The Impact of a Teaching Peer Support Group on Doctoral Student Instructors: A Collaborative Autoethnography
Location: Hospitality 1 – Room 443
Author(s): Madri Hall-Faul, MSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work;
Cindy Dubuque-Gallo, MSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Grace Felten, MSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Maritza Vasquez Reyes, MA, LCSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work

Time: 9:45 – 11:15 AM
ePoster Presentation IV: Fear and Stigma with Home Visiting: Barriers to Participation
Location: Phoenix C
Author(s): Megan Feely, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Grace Felten, MSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Kathryn E. Parr, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work

Time: 9:45 – 11:15 AM
Presentation: A Whole Health Model of Care to Promote Health Equity and Social Justice
Location: Camelback B
Author(s): Anna Faul, PhD, University of Louisville; Pamela Yankeelov, PhD, University of Louisville;
Madri Hall-Faul, MSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Samantha G. Cotton, PhD, University of Louisville Trager Institute; Joseph D'Ambrosio, PhD, University of Louisville Trager Institute; Barbara Gordon, MA, University of Louisville Trager Institute

 

Saturday, January 14

Time: 9:45 – 11:15 AM
ePoster Presentations IX: Affirmative CBT: Longitudinal Change Processes for Sexual and Gender Minority Youth
Location:
Author(s): Shelley L. Craig, PhD, LCSW, University of Toronto; Vivian Leung, MA, University of Toronto; Jenny Hui, MA, University of Toronto; Frank Dillon, PhD, Arizona State University; Ashley Austin, PhD, Barry University; Rachael Pascoe, MSW, RSW, University of Toronto; Gio Iacono, PhD, MSW, RSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Nelson Pang, MSW, University of Toronto

Time: 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Presentation: Annual Social Policy Forum: Democracy?!?!
Location: Phoenix D/E
Author(s): Darcey Merritt, PhD, University of Chicago Crown Family School of Social Work; Maria Blunt-Carter, MSW, Rutgers School of Social Work; Justin Hodge, MSW, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; and Tanya Rhodes Smith, MSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work

Time: 4:00 – 5:30 PM
Presentation: Direct Scribing as a Rigor-Promoting Technique: Centering Youth Voice throughout Data Collection and Analysis
Location: Encanto A
Author(s): Jenna Powers, MSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work

Time: 4:00 – 5:30 PM
Presentation: The Relationship between Legal Permanency Among Older Foster Youth and Their Outcomes
Location: Ahwatukee A
Author(s): Mark Courtney, PhD, University of Chicago; Sunggeun (Ethan) Park, PhD, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; Nathanael Okpych, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Justin Harty, PhD, Arizona State University

 

Sunday, January 15

Time: 8:00 – 9:30 AM
ePoster Presentations XI: Risk, Race/Ethnicity and Subsequent Reports in a State’s Differential Response System
Location: Marquis BR Salon 6
Author(s): Megan Feely, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Brenda Kurz, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Patricia Carlson, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Melissa Ives, MSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Joshua Pierce, BA, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Kimberly Nilson, State of Connecticut Department of Children and Families

Time: 8:00 – 9:30 AM
ePoster Presentations XI: Doulas: A Possible Solution to Birth Inequities Among Families of Color
Location: Phoenix C
Author(s): Mollie Lazar Charter, PhD, MSW, Fordham University; Kathryn E. Parr, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work, Jane Lee, University of Connecticut School of Social Work, Juliany Polar, University of Connecticut School of Social Work

Time: 9:45 – 11:15 AM
Presentation: State-Level Predictors of Core Priorities Spending in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Program: Implications for Human Rights and Equity
Location: Laveen B
Author(s): Madri Hall-Faul, MSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Anna Faul, PhD, University of Louisville

Time: 9:45 – 11:15 AM
Presentation: Critical Time Intervention for People Leaving Residential Substance Use Treatment: The Feasibility and Preliminary Impact of a Pilot Randomized Trial
Location: Hospitality 1 – Room 443
Author(s): Jennifer Manuel, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Khadija Israel, MSW, New York University; Yeqing Yuan, PhD, LCSW, New York University; Laura Esquivel, MSW, New York University; Laura Curran, MA, New York University; Daniel Herman, Hunter College Silberman School of Social Work

Time: 9:45 – 11:15 AM
Presentation: Writing and Reviewing for Refereed Journals: Discussion with Editorial Advisory Board Members
Location: Valley of the Sun E
Author(s): Cristina Mogro-Wilson, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Sondra Fogel, PhD, University of South Florida; and Kirstin Anderson, Social Current

Time: 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Presentation: Rates of Infants Reported to CPS at Birth for Prenatal Substance Exposure: A Panel Data Analysis
Location: Estrella
Author(s): Rebecca Rebbe, PhD, University of Southern California; Margaret Lloyd Sieger, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; John Prindle, PhD, University of Southern California

Time: 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Presentation: Connect: Plans of Safe Care for Substance-Exposed Infants
Location: Estrella
Author(s): Margaret Lloyd Sieger, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Cynthia Nichols, MSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Ira J. Chasnoff, MD, NTI Upstream

Time: 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Presentation: A Primer on Conducting Scoping Reviews: Purpose, Guidelines, and Resources
Location: Camelback A
Author(s): Jon Phillips, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Social Work; Daniel Gibbs, MSW, JD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Kalah M. Villagrana, MSW, MPA, Arizona State University; and Elizabeth Jurczak, MSW, University of Connecticut School of Social Work

Dean’s Statement about Sexual Harassment

From the Office of Dean Heller

Dear Colleagues,

I am writing to address several reports of sexual harassment by faculty and students who attended the Council on Social Work Education Annual Program Meeting (CSWE APM) 2022 last week. I want to thank those who came forward to share their experiences on social media, with CSWE, and with my office.

CSWE has stated that they are investigating and I will closely follow the outcome of their pledge to take action. Unfortunately, these kinds of behaviors have been more frequently occurring at professional conferences. Behaviors like this cannot be tolerated and must be dealt with swiftly. We firmly stand with the individuals who have had this distressing experience.

First and foremost, I would like to say that as the Dean of the School of Social Work, I unequivocally condemn any forms of sexual harassment toward students, faculty or staff. The fact that this offensive behavior took place off campus makes it no less serious or worth addressing. The safety and dignity of our students and faculty are paramount, and that safety should be ensured on our campus as well as at events where members of our community are engaged in work on behalf of the School.

I am especially troubled by the fact that students and junior faculty would have to endure unwelcome conduct at a point in their careers where they may not feel empowered to speak up or resist. Please know that the School of Social Work fully supports the reporting, anonymous or otherwise, of sexual harassment or violence by our students and faculty. Employees can contact the Employee Assistance Program for counseling or support.

As social workers, we stand firmly in defense of the dignity of all people. As a School, we also recognize that opposing sexual misconduct is part of our strong commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion for all members of our community.

In solidarity,

Nina Rovinelli Heller, Ph.D.
Dean and Professor
Zachs Chair in Social Work

 

 

 

Social Work Faculty Presentations at CSWE Annual Program Meeting

CSWE APM 2022

We are proud to announce the presentations that UConn School of Social Work faculty will lead at the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) 2022 Annual Program Meeting (APM), from November 10 through 13.  The following list of presentations and sessions represents the wide range of scholarship that School of Social Work researchers are engaged in, including human rights, child welfare, COVID-19, political social work, refugee and immigrant rights, and more.

Thursday, November 10

Time: 3:00 – 3:30 PM
Presentation: “Academic Mothers: A Discussion on More Equitable Structural Policies in the Academy”
Session: The Social Work Gaze and Academy
Author(s): Cristina Mogro-Wilson, Ph.D. and Nalini Negi, Ph.D.

Friday, November 11

Time: 7:45 – 8:15 AM
Presentation: “A Human Rights-Based Policy Analysis of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families”
Session: SNAP and Temporary Assistance Reviews
Author(s): Madri Hall-Faul, MSW

Time: 8:15 – 8:45 AM
Presentation: “Fulfilling the Right to Adequate Food: Examining SNAP through a Qualitative Lens”
Session: SNAP and Temporary Assistance Reviews
Author(s): Emily Loveland, MSW

Time: 10:30 – 11:30 AM
Presentation: “Writing and Reviewing for Refereed Journals: Strategies for Successful Publishing and Ethical Peer Review”
Session: Writing and Reviewing for Refereed Journals: Strategies for Successful Publishing and Ethical Peer Review
Author(s): Cristina Mogro-Wilson, Ph.D., Danielle Parrish, Ph.D., Elissa Madden, Ph.D., and Jeremiah Jaggers, Ph.D.

Time: 11:15 – 11:45 AM
Presentation: “Building Pedagogical Identities Across Cohorts: A Collaborative Autoethnography of a Doctoral Peer Support Group”
Session: American Higher Education and Pedagogical Identities
Author(s): Lukas Champagne, MSW, Elizabeth Jurczak, MSW, and Breana Bietsch, MSW

Time: 11:15 – 11:45 AM
Presentation: “The Importance of Critical Relational Teaching in Social Work Education During the COVID-19 Era”
Session: Teaching and COVID-19
Author(s): Gio Iacono, Ph.D. and Emily Loveland, MSW

Time: 1:15 - 1:45 PM
Presentation: “Increasing Early Childhood Disability Content in Social Work Education: Traumatic Brain Injury and how to Create Interdisciplinary Teams and Family Partnerships”
Session: TBD
Presented by: Emily Longo, LMFT

Time: 2:30 – 3:30 PM
Presentation: “Resurgence of Radical Extremism: Critical Conversations on Human and Global Rights by Social Workers”
Session: Connect
Author(s): Rebecca Thomas, Ph.D., Golam Mathbor, MSS, MSW, Ph.D., RSW, Connie Gunderson, Ph.D., LISW, Sister Angela Kim, IHM, Ph.D., and Johny Augustine, MSW, M.Phil, Ph.D.

Saturday, November 12

Time: 12:00 – 12:30 PM
Presentation: “At the Table or on the Menu: Political Social Work Since 2016”
Session: TBD
Author(s): Shannon Lane, LMSW, Ph.D., Tanya Rhodes Smith, MSW, Kathryn Krase, JD, MSW, Ph.D., and Katherine Hill, MSW, Ph.D., MPP, LISE

Time: 3:45 – 4:15 PM
Presentation: “Providing Students and Professionals with a Conceptual Foundation and Empirical Justification for Cross-Systems Collaboration”
Session: Cross-Systems Collaboration and Global Conflict Resolution
Author(s): Jon Phillips, Ph.D., Daniel Gibbs, JD, MSW, Elizabeth Jurczak, MSW, and Kalah Villagrana, Ph.D.

Sunday, November 13

Time: 9:30 – 10:30 AM
Panel Presentation: “Deservingness, Differential Treatment, and Dehumanization of Refugees, Asylees, and Asylum-Seekers”
Session: Deservingness, Differential Treatment, and Dehumanization of Refugees, Asylees, and Asylum-Seekers
Author(s): Kathryn Libal, Ph.D., S. Megan Berthold, Ph.D., David Androff, Ph.D., Scott Harding, Ph.D., and Cherra Mathis, MSW

Time: 10:45 – 11:45 AM
Panel Presentation: “Fulfilling U.S. Children’s Human Rights through the UN Children’s Rights Convention”
Session: Fulfilling U.S. Children’s Human Rights through the UN Children’s Rights Convention
Author(s): Kathryn Libal, Ph.D., S. Megan Berthold, Ph.D., and Madri Hall-Faul, MSW

 

Celebrating Indigenous People’s Day

From the Office of Dean Heller

Dear Colleagues,

The second Monday in October is Indigenous People’s Day. Also known as Columbus Day, this federal holiday was first established in 1937. Last year, President Biden issued a proclamation to formally recognize Indigenous People’s Day.

Today, many universities and municipalities take this opportunity to celebrate the history and cultures of indigenous people. The very name of the state of Connecticut derives from the Mohegan word Quinnitukqut, meaning “long, tidal river.” Connecticut is home to numerous Indigenous communities, including but not limited to the Mahican tribes, the Minisink, the Mohegan tribes, the Pequot, Nipmuc, the Qquiripi tribes (including the Mattabesic, Paugusett, and Schaghticoke), the Paucatuck Eastern Pequot, and the Eastern Pequot. As a land grant university, UConn recognizes we share this land with those who came before us and continue to contribute to our state.

Highlighting this holiday aligns with the ethics of the social work profession which values the dignity of each person. It also exemplifies our commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion and anti-racism, a cornerstone of our School’s mission.

Please consider taking part in events related to Indigenous People's Day, which are posted by the UConn Native American Culture Programs. Also learn about Native American and Indigenous studies and programming at UConn.

 

In solidarity,

 

Nina Rovinelli Heller
Dean and Zach’s Chair

 

 

 

 

 

Honoring Hispanic Heritage Month

From the Desk of Dean Heller

Dear Colleagues,

Thursday, September 15, is the start of Hispanic Heritage Month. This annual event celebrates the many diverse cultures and histories of Hispanic and Latinx/a/o communities. At the School of Social Work, we are pleased to highlight the achievements and contributions of these communities to our country and world.

This year’s theme is “Unidos: Inclusivity for a Strong Nation,” a sentiment that we believe and support at our School. Diversity, equity, inclusion, and anti-racism (DEI/AR) are central to our mission and infused throughout our Strategic Plan for the next five years. Our goals include engaging faculty and staff in meaningful dialogue about DEI/AR in our community and in our work. This dialogue, and a commitment to social justice action and accountability, make our School and community stronger.

We know there is a growing need for Spanish-speaking social workers in our community and state. In response, we launched a Spanish-speaking child welfare track for our bachelor’s students who intern at the Department for Children and Families. We have also revived our Puerto Rico Study Travel Program, which enhances the skills of students to work with Hispanic and Latinx/a/o communities.

Inclusion means more than representation but also fostering a sense of belonging for our students, staff, faculty, and members of our community. To that end, we are co-sponsoring with Hartford Campus and the School of Law a kick-off event on September 15 at the Hartford Public Library. Please join us to partake in live music, refreshments, networking and to hear our guest speaker Jacquelyn Santiago Nazario of COMPASS Youth Collaborative. RSVP here: s.uconn.edu/sswhhm. The Puerto Rican / Latin American Cultural Center’s (PRLACC) is also promoting several events throughout the month.

 

In solidarity,

Nina Rovinelli Heller
Dean and Zach’s Chair

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Celebrating Freedom on Juneteenth

From the Office of Dean Heller

Dear Colleagues,

Sunday is Juneteenth, the day that commemorates the end of slavery in the United States. Also known as America’s Second Independence Day or Emancipation Day, Juneteenth has been celebrated by African Americans since the late 1800s. Last year, it was made a federal holiday by President Biden, and this year the Connecticut legislature also designated Juneteenth an official holiday.

Recognition of Juneteenth, the day in 1865 when Union troops enforced the Emancipation Proclamation in the last slave-owning community in the U.S., is welcome but long overdue. At the School of Social Work, we honor Juneteenth as part of our commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion and anti-racism (DEI/AR). We join with the University’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Provost’s Office in celebrating the history and culture of Black and African American communities. We also acknowledge the ongoing struggle for freedom and fight to end anti-Black racism and oppression in all its forms.

During the 2021-2022 academic year, our faculty and staff met regularly to discuss how we would implement DEI/AR as part of our Strategic Plan. We are finalizing a definition of anti-racism for our School and developing concrete steps that we will take to support the aspirations and empowerment of our Black and African American students, staff, faculty and communities. This commitment is not only in keeping with the ethics of our profession, but it’s an imperative in this era of resurgent white supremacy.

To respect and highlight Juneteenth, I encourage everyone to explore the resources that the UConn Library has compiled in honor of the holiday, and to explore educational and cultural events in your community.

 

In solidarity,

Nina Rovinelli Heller, PhD
Dean and Professor
Zachs Chair in Social Work

Dr. Cristina Mogro-Wilson Named Editor-in-Chief of Families in Society Journal

SOCIAL CURRENT® ANNOUNCES APPOINTMENT OF DR. CRISTINA MOGRO-WILSON OF UCONN SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK AS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF FOR FAMILIES IN SOCIETY JOURNAL

Dr. Mogro-Wilson to Succeed Dr. Sondra Fogel, Who Helmed FIS For the Past Seven Years

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Social Current, formerly the Alliance for Strong Families and Communities and the Council onFaculty member Cristina Wilson Accreditation, today announced the selection of Dr. Cristina Mogro-Wilson to serve as Editor-in-Chief of the Families in Society (FIS) journal, which was previously led by Dr. Sondra Fogel, who served as Editor-In-Chief for the past seven years.

Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services has been a core journal in social work research for over 100 years. Launched in 1920 by Mary E. Richmond, a pioneer in the field and the founder of social casework, the journal built a knowledge base for the first systematized approaches to the practice of social work and has been stewarded over the years by the Alliance for Strong Families and Communities. Families in Society is published in partnership with SAGE Publishing.

“We are thrilled to welcome Dr. Mogro-Wilson, whose work as a recognized Latina scholar and expert in health disparities and culturally-responsive practice and education in racial minority populations will greatly inform the future direction of FIS,” noted Dr. Jody Levison-Johnson, president and CEO of Social Current. “Addressing the challenges that families face today, including socio-economic disparities, racism, substance misuse and behavioral health disorders, requires an evidence-informed approach that is grounded in social change through the lens of advancing equity. Dr. Mogro-Wilson’s body of work is uniquely attuned to addressing these vital issues and aligns closely with Social Current’s commitment to advancing equitable solutions to society’s toughest challenges through collaboration, innovation, policy and practice excellence.”

“As a Latina social worker, I value social justice and am committed to advancing equity,” noted Dr. Mogro-Wilson. “I look forward to working with the FIS team of scholars to increase the vitality and relevance of FIS though diverse representation in advisory board members, peer reviewers, manuscript authors, and – importantly - the readership. The art, science, and practice of social work are such important elements of the discipline because they can strengthen families and communities and help all people achieve their full potential. That’s why inclusiveness, transparency, and authenticity in FIS scholarship will help advance transformational research and practice, which in turn supports efforts to ensure everyone experiences well-being and opportunity.”

Dr. Mogro-Wilson received her MSW from the University of Michigan, with a focus on practice with children, youth, and families in 2003, followed by her PhD from the University at Albany, School of Social Welfare in 2007. Most recently, she has served as Assistant Professor in Residence at the UCONN Health Center in the School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics from 2007-2009, transitioning to the School of Social Work (SSW) tenure-related tracks, achieving tenure in 2015 as an Associate Professor in SSW. As of August 2022, Dr. Mogro-Wilson will be a full Professor at SSW.

She served as the director for the Puerto Rican and Latin@ Studies Project (PRLSP) from 2015-2017, leading them to sustainable achievements in the acquisition of research grants and the development of a bilingual/bicultural MSW program. The PRLSP has been referenced and used as a model in various arenas such as the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) and different social work programs throughout the nation.

From 2019-2022, she served as research director for the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD) with a focus on supporting design and implementation of applied qualitative and quantitative research projects; the development of research proposals to secure private, state, and federal funding to sustain and grow the UCEDD's research and evaluation agenda; and the development of policy analysis related to programs demonstrating the full inclusion of people with disabilities in education, work, and community life.

Dr. Mogro-Wilson’s publishing experience includes serving as an editorial advisory board member and more recently as an associate editor for Families and Society and Journal of Social Work Education (JSWE), which is the flagship journal for CSWE. She co-edited a special issue of JSWE on Teaching, Field Instruction and Administration in the Time of Pandemic or Natural Disaster, with Danielle Parrish and Nalini Negi during the COVID pandemic, co-authoring an editorial on the hidden cost of caregiving during the pandemic. As a Graduate Faulty Representative and member of the National Nominating Committee and Council on Publications for CSWE from 2018-2021, she also worked to ensure anti-racist and diverse representative content in CSWE publications.

“We are confident that Dr. Mogro-Wilson will build on the legacy launched by FIS founder Mary E. Richmond and the many who have helmed the journal since,” added Dr. Levison-Johnson. “A special thank you goes out to Dr. Sondra Fogel who has stewarded FIS for the past seven years, mentoring Dr. Mogro-Wilson and other scholars in the pursuit of academic excellence in the field of social work practice, policy, and research.”

For more information on a subscription to Families in Society, please contact Kirstin Anderson at kanderson@social-current.org.

Honoring Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

From the Office of Dean Heller

Dear Colleagues,

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. First established as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week in 1978, the observance was expanded to a month by Congress in 1992. At the School of Social Work, we take this opportunity to recognize and celebrate the contributions of Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) students, staff, faculty, and members of our community.

The past few years have been especially challenging for AAPI communities who have faced harassment and attacks across our nation. As a School that values diversity, equity, inclusion and anti-racism, we oppose this bigotry and stand in solidarity with AAPI communities. We know they make UConn and the School of Social Work stronger.

Our support of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month aligns with the mission of our profession and the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics. These ethical standards include social justice, dignity and worth of the person, and the importance of human relationships.

All month long, let’s make a commitment to honoring the rich heritage and cultural experiences of AAPI communities. Throughout U.S. history, AAPIs have contributed to and shaped American culture, science, medicine, literature, art, government, politics and so much more. Today, AAPIs are the fastest growing racial group in the country. Read the history and take part in events in your local area.

In solidarity,

Nina

Nina Rovinelli Heller, PhD
Dean and Professor
Zachs Chair in Social Work